Want to keep working? Plan ahead

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A study done at the University of Gothenburg says if you plan to work in your senior years, you should start planning before age 50.

The researchers, psychologists Kerstin Wentz and Kristina Gyllensten, say their participants engaged in what they call career crafting. This meant taking themselves seriously and thinking about what they wanted in life. Remaining employed at least part time allowed them to flourish and avoid boredom while maintaining a social life. They were proactive about learning new things.

The researchers advise vocational counseling for those age 45 similar to what is given to teenagers. They also advocate making student loans available.

As an avid devotee of MOOCs and webinars, I love this idea. Personally, I grew to hate the career in the insurance industry I stumbled into at age 18. At age 45, I embarked on a master’s degree to pursue something more meaningful. I cycled through several stop gap jobs until I finally got a job at a community college. That whole process might have been shortened if I had done better research and planning.

What’s your story? Will you continue working past “normal” retirement age?

Brain clutter

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Oh, man. It’s not enough that I have to worry about clutter in my house. Now I have to worry about clutter in my brain.

According to a study done at Georgia Institute of Technology, older people lack confidence in what they remember because their brains have absorbed not only what they focused on but also non-essential info, i.e., clutter-what other conversations were taking place around them, what music was playing.

Younger folks apparently don’t have this problem. Their brains don’t store the irrelevant details in the first place.

The researchers point out that this can be particularly problematic for seniors if someone tries to scam them. They can be convinced they have forgotten something that never took place.

I feel a little ambivalent about all of this. As a writer, I would think that the ability, albeit unconscious, to note more details would be an advantage, not a detriment. Is this a function purely of having lived longer and having more backstory to connect new material to? Do we become less sure of everything as we age just because we’re increasingly aware of how little we really know?