A cautionary tale

elizabethorr

 

I rcently talked to a friend of mine who had been hospitalized earlier this year. She lives alone and had nobody there to advocate for her. She was at the mercy of the staff. “I just did whatever they told me. If they had told me to jump off the roof I would have,” she related to me. I can think of few situations more frightening.

Two years ago, my husband was admitted to the hospital 5 times over a six month period. To say it was a stressful experience is a massive understatement. So when I was offered the opportunity to review Elizabeth Orr’s book, I was hesitant. Did I want to relive that stress? I didn’t, but in the end my curiosity about how medicine is handled in the UK and about Elizabeth’s own story won out.

When Elizabeth’s beloved older brother suffered a health crisis, she went to bat for him. He wasn’t married, so as next of kin, it all fell on her. What she had to deal with from bureaucracy was heart-breaking and very familiar. Waiting endlessly to see or speak with someone in charge. Hearing conflicting advice. Being subjected to unnecessary or at least unexplained procedures. Not learning about resources until it was too late to use them.

I will confess that her situation was far worse than ours. I think the US system still beats the UK. Her poor brother did not survive. I commend her for having the courage to write all of what happnd to her and to him. Her book should be required reading in medical schools.

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